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CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 12:00pm EST
experiences in israel where she's lived off and on since 2006. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. >> good afternoon, welcome. i'm the director here at the hudson institute, a son sore on islam, democracy, and the future of the islam world which publishing a journal on islamism called "current trends in islamic ideology," which i co-edit with my colleagues ambassador haqqani and eric brown. it's my pleasure to host today's event. its subject is a wonderful new book by my guest, lelya gilbert, and here it is. its title is "saturday people, sunday people: israel through the eyes of a christian so jowrner," and ms. gilbert is here to discuss her book with us. before introducing and turning to the book itself, let me say a few words by way of introduction about herself. she has had a very impressive and varied career, much of it concerned with the arts including music. she has been a song writer and worked extensively with musical groups including an african children's chorus based in uganda and based of uganda and orphans. she passed on her gifts two her two sons, colin and dylan. co
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 7:00pm EST
intensely of grievances, including grievances against the united states and israel and most importantly against their own unrepresentative pro-western government in regime. amendment the islamic republic has done is aligned itself with public opinion at south in the middle east to constrain hostile governments from attacking a. just think about how barbering largely shia population would react to the fleetest our fifth fleet based in bahrain to attack the islamic republic today. u.s. military planners could hope that the iran's population would be passive as they think they assumed maybe even five years ago. but today it clearly seems reckless. for other ridiculing many american policy elites do with the islamic republic, the appeal to regional public actually works. it works to constrain the united states and hostile, unrepresentative pro-western neighboring iran. iran is also the two reinforce these aspects of a software strategy of a number of years at picking what we would call winners, zero, hamas, hezbollah, shia groups, even the muslim brotherhood political ally and key regional
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 9:00am EST
intentionally-felt grievances including their grievances against the united states and israel and, most importantly, their grievances against their own unrepresentative, pro-western governments and regimes. and then what the islamic republic has done is it has aligned itself with those publics, with public opinion itself in the middle east to constrain hostile governments from attacking it. just think about how bahrain's already-angry, largely shia population would react if we used our fifth fleet based in bahrain to attack the islamic republic today. u.s. military planners could hope that bahrain's population would be passive, as i think they assumed maybe each five years ago -- maybe even five years ago, but today that clearly seems reckless. for all the ridiculing many american policy elites do of the islamic republic, the islamic republic's appeal to regional publics actually works. it works to constrain the united states and hostile, unrepresentative, pro-western governments neighboring iran. iran has also worked to reip force these -- reinforce these aspects of it soft power
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2013 7:00pm EST
there ran and the nuclear threat to israel. and the position germany was taking relative to that end i was questioning where they might be should there be a real threat or attack. of course you know that's not what we would -- the public would want us to do, but he said given the holocaust we have no choice. to be fair. we cannot stand by and let another holocaust he plays. so those decades of remorse until over the holocaust still dictates policy relative to support for israel, even though the public now decades on says vitamin e to do to do that again? and do we want to get mixed up and not? so that's kind of a unique dynamic that exists in that regard. but it's somewhat of a tenuous relationship. i spent a lot of time with the israeli ambassador, who spent a lot of time at the germans relative to german policy towards israel and a whole number of ways. so anything short of direct threat or attack on israel, dispenses favors we wish we could get this resolved and we wish israel would be much more flex will relative to the west bank and relative to the palestinians. >> i think we have
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 1:00pm EST
eventually to southern israel, and by '69 they made it to southern israel and have been there ever since. very few people talk about this community. what was once 400 people who left are now 34 hundred, and it's a story about how the community in israel uses that as a base to connect with community members on five different continentses all over the world. there's a change of folks throughout the united states and i'm interested in how they use the media technology to build this transnational spiritual community, and it's a fascinating story that few people know about. so it would be fun to bring that to hopefully a wide audience. >> host: you're finishing it but self months before at it published. >> guest: not until the end of 2013. >> host: we have been talking with university of pennsylvania professor dr. john l. jackson, jr., here's the book. racial pair nowa, the unintended consequences of political correctness, this is book tv on c-span2. >> now from the university of pennsylvania. we discuss the new media regime replacing professional journalism. this interview is part of book tv
CSPAN
Jan 14, 2013 8:00pm EST
afghanistan because that's a war zone, and then israel i have an exception for, under my proposal, because of the heightened risk of conflict. should be weakened financially because we cut them off, or if cutting them off would appear to be a move to distance ourself and might embolden israel's foes, and my amendment would fully fund the proposal of chairman hall rogers. >> mr. burgess. >> thank you for the recognition, i want to thank all of you for your work on the eliminating offset amendments. there was a 1% across the board offset that turned out to be $9 billion when, in 2005-2006, and there is a crs report delineates that. i think there's precedence for looking at this. one question i would have for you is, how will this funding be affected by the sequester? is there already an across the board cut that comes through the sequester and is your cut in addition to the sequester or is this funding carved out and protected? >> my understanding, doctor, is that both the underlying bill and my amendment would be on top of the sequester. >> so they're protected from the cuts or the
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 7:30am EST
from two perspectives. i look at the global forces that affect america, american jews, ma and israel, everything from the shift of power from the united states and the west to china and east, the powers of globalization in the digital era, how to deal with the 1.6 billion muslims in the world, the threats of iranian nuclear power. and i also look at internal threats, low birthrates, assimilation. and again, whether we can in effect succeed at a time when we are more successful than ever in being integrated into our society. it's a new phenomenon, and that's really what i wanted to write the book. i also write about that from an israeli perspective. i've been to israel maybe 40 times. three times this year alone. during the carter and clinton administrations i was deeply involved in policies between the u.s. and israel, but i also write from the perspective of someone who has relatives in israel, who has spent many, many years in times and israel. so it's a unique perspective, looking from the outside in and from the inside out. >> ambassador eizenstat, israel was one of a few foreign
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2013 12:00pm EST
security. as i say, this amendment would be even more detrimental to our ally, israel, for which the continuing instability in egypt is an abiding clear and present danger. i have seen no objections raised by our israeli allies to u.s. military assistance to egypt, nor do i expect to see any. here, too, i would urge my colleague to pick up the phone and call the israeli ambassador or just recall what i'm sure he heard from israel's leaders during his recent visit there a few weeks ago. this amendment is absolutely harmful to the national security of our ally, israel. the timing of the amendment is also detrimental because our government is currently engaged in discussions with the egyptian government and military about the need to shift our security cooperation more towards the kinds of programs and equipment that egypt needs to combat the threats they increasingly face: porous borders, a rising threat from terrorism, deteriorating conditions in the sinai, and a security sector in dire need of reform. mr. mccain: it is in egypt's interest to move in this direction, as they are be
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2013 5:00pm EST
nefarious activity and in some cases resolutions which attack israel or other things we are better able to effect that and negate if we are participating. and then if we cease to pay the dues and so forth to take a different attitude than we see we sort of lose the opportunity to protect our friends which we want to have the are getting close to the line that would be very damaging if there were any effort to take israel for instance or any other country, if there is any effort to try to invoke other power that is the kind of unilateral action that we would feel very, very strongly against it and see it as extremely counterproductive. my hope is that, you know, there were just elections yesterday. we don't know what kind of government will be formed or where they will go, but my prayer is that perhaps this can be a moment where we can renew some kind of effort to get the parties into a discussion to have a different track than we have been on over the course of the last couple of years. and i would like to reserve all of the capacity to be able to do that, so i'm just going to stop
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 9:05am EST
holloman thing, either brave or suicidal, maybe some combination of the two, who dared to visit israel on a couple of different occasions and thought iraq had actually normalize relations with israel, for which sentiments he faced attempts to get him in prison, which he successfully beat, and in an iraqi court, he did not however manage to stop extremists who, in 2005, attacked him and his sons and killed his two sons in retaliation for his country and visiting israel. but he was not discouraged and he ran for parliament and you want a seat in 2005. but i remember being with him in his living room in baghdad in 2008. .. about this with emma scott, one of the great experts who was an insider during this period. we did jerry little to stop them especially in 2010 under the obama administration when they took it very hands-off attitude basically saying we are not going to get involved in the outcome of the iraqi political debate. all we care about is having free and fair elections. to my mind, that is a mistake and it's proven to be a mistake in practice, because it's allowed a essentially t
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 12:00am EST
getting in, but once we got into israel and coming through israel into jerusalem it was not to oppose it. i'm sure they could have shut it down if they wanted to. >> host: we always hear of some conflict and the word terrorism is always mentioned. here you found the net interest and nonviolence. >> host: >> guest: including one of the students that had taken my class and i had taken him to india. a student from ramallah so i would take him to hindu and he comes back to his home town of ramallah and is one of the leaders of the nonviolent movement on the west bank and stays the freedom ride in the west bank. >> host: how did it turn out? >> guest: i got arrested of course, but it was a way of challenging the discrimination against the palestinians in a non-violent way. >> host: there is so much to talk about. we didn't get to your being on the mall again when the monument was dedicated. did you have anything to do with the drum major concord? >> guest: i tell the story of that, the good and that and you see part of the division and of the things that are set in stone -- >> host: how did y
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 8:00am EST
iranians know that israel has nuclear weapons and we have nuclear-weapons and they feel they would like to be in charge of there and destiny or player at the table i think and i have written carefully in a book about iran and i wish you would read it carefully because i think it is a very complicated subject. also -- i know is complicated. the iranians are very good negotiators. they have been negotiating for 3,000 years and our people, i feel for them but i don't know who are the negotiators, if there've to that sort of negotiation. the iranians are. it is important to understand their culture and i do think in terms of hostages it was not fully understood, i don't want to go to great length but they were not understood. two things come out of this. we should not have to interfere in other countries. we as a country should lead by example. this country has been incredible what it has done to integrate raises and countries and languages and people and we should do leadership by that. and i think also that we should listen to what the iranians are saying. sometimes what is quoted as
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 10:00pm EST
really. i had a little bit of trouble getting in. but once we got into israel israel, coming through israel into jerusalem, they just chose not to oppose it. i'm sure they could have. >> host: always read your conflict the word terrorism is always mentioned. here they had interest in nonviolence. >> guest: including one of the students who had taken with my class and took a student from india. palestinian student going with me to him to indiana and comes back to his hometown and now one of the leaders of student non-violent movement on the west bank and staged the freedom riots and the west bank. >> host: he did? >> guest: he got arrested of course. but it was a way to challenge the discrimination in the nonviolent way. >> host: we did not get to you being on the mall again when the monument was dedicated. did you have to do anything about the drum major conflict? >> guest: i tell the whole story. part of the vision set in stone and the
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 12:00am EST
iraq should normalize elections with israel for which sentiments face attempts to give him presents in an iraqi court. he did not however manage to stop the extremists who have tracked his sons and killed his two sons for his retaliation for visiting israel. he ran for parliament in one of seidin 2005 but i remember meeting with him in his living room in baghdad in 2000 where he was showing the fact that he had little money to run for re-election and little money with like-minded candidates where all the radical extremists in iraq were receiving copious funds from the quds force from the iranians and he said the iranians called him up and said how would he like $5 million or a similar amount? yes said no thank you, i'm opposed to what you stand for but there were few people in iraq that would turn down a offer like that from whatever source. would happen in iraq was the iranians basically had free run to assert their influence and we did very little to stop them, especially so in 2010. i was just talking about this with them its guy who was one of the great experts in iraq in the wo
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 9:00pm EST
getting in but once we got into israel coming to israel and jerusalem they chose not to oppose it to a i'm sure that they had shut it down if they wanted to >> host: the word terrorism as always mentioned. here you found the interest in nonviolence. >> guest: yes, including one of the students that had worked with me in the class and i had taken him to india. a student from ramallah so i had a palestinian student in hindu india and he comes back to his hometown in ramallah and now she is one of the leaders of the nonviolent movement and on the west bank and he staged the freedom ride. >> host: how did it turn out? >> guest: they got arrested of course. that's what happens. but it was a way of challenging the discrimination against palestinians in a non-violent way. >> host: there's so much to talk about. we didn't get into your being on the mall again that was dedicated. did you have anything to do with the major -- >> guest: i tell the full story of that, all the good and bad and we see part of the vision set in stone and we see the things that were set in stone that or not a part of
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 11:00pm EST
listen to what the iranians are saying he said israel will be no more. he did not say annihilated. there is so much i do think they will have to understand the culture that i wish that you agree but to understand other people's culture. >> of the last few minutes if you like to ask raise your hand. >> speenine. [inaudible] >> guest: i wrote a lot in the '80s and i had files i had papers all over the house. that that is where it came from. i had a good memory but what i had done but i follow iran and various things spinet the story almost told itself. i just did the typing that it was clear to me that 68 was a pivotal year because of the moment in time in history and one of the interesting things of her life is how she lived through this time and new people like richard nixon that her perspective is one that i don't think i have ever seen a man have it is a woman's perspective because she responded to the way he treated his wife. that is what memoir can contribute because women do have a slightly different experience. another question? >> speenine. [inaudible] [inaudible] >> guest:
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 1:00am EST
national archives. i and my research assistants, including josh israel, who is up there someplace and is going to give us some entertainment with johnson and king talking, could not possibly have gotten as far as we got in trying to unravel this story. without the resources of the archives and the unfailingly courteous, bright, helpful people from the archives. i want to personally thank them not only on behalf of myself but in behalf of other people who work in this field. they are just great. the idea of this book was sort of a gamble. it was a hunch. i wondered -- there have been lots of books written about king. there have been lots of books written about johnson. there have been lots of books written about civil rights, but no one had taken johnson and king together, put them under a microscope, and watched what they did day by day through an incredible period of history. a two-year period, from the kennedy's assassination to the passage of the voting rights act when numerous of our most distinguished historians say more legislation of huge impact on our society took place in
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 8:30pm EST
always been about access to oil, a close relationship with israel, or the deployment of military forces for purposes of national security. the americans have been there for 150 years giving to the region in much more practical and beneficial ways for the people of the region, and not just for us. that's why i wrote the book. i wanted them to know that, and i wanted the american people to know that story. >> host: who was malcolm, and what what happened to him? >> guest: a professor of science at ucla who left the year before i arrived to work on my ph.d.. he grew up in beirut. his patients were on the faculty at aub, and though he made a very distinguished career for himself in the united states as a score lar of the middle east, he went home in the early 80s to lead the school during a period of particularly difficult times when beirut fractured due to the civil war and the israeli incursion of 1892, the city a mess, the school under assault, in a lot of personal danger, but he believed that going back and running the school and providing an example of leadership at a time of cr
CSPAN
Jan 7, 2013 8:30am EST
get to in this panel is syria. what's happening in israel as we gather here this weekend. and so these are the questions of our time. these are the challenges of our generation. and that's, i think, one of the great benefits of opportunities like halifax, to have a very in-depth discussion about how we act as a community; a community of democracies, a community of countries that care, that are compassionate and that are able to do something to stop the slaughter of innocent civilians. >> of the many who say that we need to as we have more young, emerging democracies like your own that they need to be stepping up to the plate and taking more of the responsibilities. so we're talking indonesia, india, brazil, turkey, south africa. but at the same time, i also hear the statement made and as they get involved increasingly and should step up to the plate and helping to nurture democracy protect human rights, that those countries also have to be careful to make sure their own house is in order in that respect, that those in glass houses can't throw stones. what are your thoughts on tha
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 5:00pm EST
democracy in general. certainly adversarial to nationstate struggling such as israel. we think in terms of categories of liberal internationalism, realism, but we haven't thought of global politics, which is now transnational. american lawyers are going to international courts to try to indict american airmen. that's transnational politics. we need a rethinking of world politics. we have a hostile player. there's many american trans nationalists and they see america to lead the way, to sort of a doubt the global governance project and have america share sovereignty. so sharing sovereignty with others and demonstrate leadership. how? subordinated themselves to supranational legal machine. america's got to a globally. it really means following global leadership. but those who promote americans and global governance say this is in our interest and it's consistent with their values. it's in our interest because with the strongest power in china and nations are coming out. so what we want to do is establish global rules now so 30 years from now or so these rules will be in place, chinese elites
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 8:45am EST
national threat institute. i'm on the advisory board. the national institute israel is in the world that pushes forward -- they invented, or we invented the return to the traditional neighborhood as alternative to suburban sprawl but they also greater a planning to become a design method which brought back and elevated to the highest possible level the involvement, the participation of citizens in the planning process. it is based here in your city is the group that works frankly internationally to share this technique. you have a real resource right here that you may not know about that's fantastic. now, what i'm going to do tonight is, because i'm sure you'll find my reading ripping because the book is a fascinating, but reading them get old so i have a short reading and then i have a slightly longer reading. i'll start with a short reading which introduces the book. i'll talk a little bit, and then i will do a slightly longer reading, and then i have a rant. we will see how that goes. i'll make sure there is time for questions as well. so, let's begin. and i should say i just fin
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2013 5:00pm EST
in washington. >> israel conducted an airstrike in syria. i wondered if the president was aware of that as he endorsed that military action? >> i don't have any comment for you on those reports. a retreat to the government is surreal for questions about deliberations or actions that may or may not taken. i just don't have anything for you on it. yes. >> on sequestration, senator reid mentioned yesterday taken a look at oil and gas and tax breaks as one way for sequestration. i think that's what you just mentioned. i'm just wondering, how actively as the white house working on not an in sequestration are not specific point and how concern is the white house that getting rid of these would affect what is one of the few bright spots in the economy, all the jobs and economies. >> one of the few bright spots? i contest that. i think there has been, as i just noted, a month to month job creation. there was positive economic growth in 2012, 2011 and we continue to believe this as i that unless actions by those in washington take us in a different direction, we will see positive economic g
CSPAN
Jan 8, 2013 9:00am EST
development in the region with nonstate actor, hezbollah, sending drone over israel. yes, there can be expected or usually expected reaction which is a military retaliation by israel to destroy the drone and potentially later destroying military installations inside lebanon, but if we want to keep the situation safer for us as lebanese people, is there a point of thinking about international cooperation and through technology to diffuse and reduce the technological capacities of nonstate actors to create situations that can lead to terrible problems for the whole population? >> there's a big one. who wants to handle it? >> well, i think the questioner pointed out a very important point. i think it gets back to attribution. who are we dealing with? who is the threat? is it a criminal threat? is it an act of war? we have to be very certain before we begin to react to a certain situation because that will determine what the target will be. i think the general has outlined the -- some of the very important principles, the collection of information, the analysis of that information, and the
CSPAN
Jan 15, 2013 5:00pm EST
israel in both word and deed, and has proven willing to work with us toward shared objectives, including a ceasefire during the crisis in gaza last year. these commitments are essential for our relations with egypt as well as stability in the region. we will always speak out against language that espouses religious hatred or encourages the use of violence and have raised our concerns over these remarks with the government of egypt. >> does the white house believe that israelis contrasting to uphold is in of the bargain? >> we strongly condemn the comments and believe that he should make clear that he respects people of all faiths and this type of rhetoric is unacceptable. three -- we work within toward objectives. he has demonstrated in word and deed is a commitment to the peace treaty with israel which is significant and that obviously worked with us to resolve or to achieve a peace settlement in -- a cease-fire, rather, in the does the conflict last year, so this is about action, indeed, and we believe that way goods like that is to tolerated in the region and has been accep
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2013 8:00pm EST
wish to become in the future. >> a lot of times the israel prime minister, the defense prime minister was in town shortly there after we started hearing concerns about syrian chemical weapons and -- [inaudible] made some form. and then about a week or so later you said that the threat seemed to have been put on the back burner. what is your view right now? has it changed and, general dempsey, you think there's anything militarily to stop the syrians from using chemical weapons? >> you know, i think right now the bigger concern that nodes to be focused on is assuming assad comes down and, you know, i think there's a stronger likelihood that could happen. how do we secure the sites in what do we do to deal with that situation? and that is a discretion that we are having, not only with the israelis but with other countries in the region to try to look at you know what steps need to be taken in order to make sure that the -- sites are secured and they don't wind up in the wrong hands. i think the greater concern right now is what steps does the international community take to mak
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 8:00pm EST
to lead the children of israel out of egypt that they began to grumble against his leadership. four years said they dislike his policies so much a member trade to that amount of office. it was a close though, but somehow manage to keep his job. in numbers chapter 11, we read he went to the wilderness, a wonderful endearing story goes out to the wilderness and mrs. hanssen prays, god, just kill me now. [laughter] i don't want to do this anymore. it is too hard. but this is one-time god did not answer mrs. prayer. instead he said in essence, get back to work. i need you. i'm reminded in a january 1957 dr. king received a threatening phone call. his children were asleep, wife was asleep. that was his first phone call since the boycott. than many. his children wifely sleeping he thought he couldn't go on. at midnight, he bowed over the kitchen table and began to pray. i'm afraid, lord. the people are looking to me for leadership and if i stand before them with a strength and courage, day two will falter. i'm at the end of my powers, god. i have not seen last. i've come to the point wher
CSPAN
Jan 9, 2013 8:00pm EST
strategic air lift that saved israel in the yom kippur war. [applause] israel never had a better friend said golda mayor. in november 1972, richard nixon was rewarded with the most landslide than 49 states and 60% of the vote. he comes to the campaigns, he had led in 66 and 68, 72, a party on its deathbed in 1964 was on its way to becoming the new majority party, america's party, which it captured the presidency and win more than 40 states and for the next five presidential elections. that was the president's accomplishment. the president's memoirs begin. i was born in a house my father built while the republican party in the last third or 20th centuries was the house that you build. [applause] and domestic policy was the first environmental president in environmental quality in apa to battle the scourge of cancer he established the national cancer institute two close the generations had professionalized military. he added the draft. he made six nominations for the supreme court. not a bad average when you consider the senate are up against. as for southern strategy, when richard nixon took
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 6:00pm EST
israelis -- i know that in israel, the jewish people, you tell them that hitler were alive, i think that there would be a lot of people trying to get him -- i guess, the same similar situation with the cubans. c-span: have you known a lot of people in your life that have said the same thing, that they would be glad to kill fidel castro? >> guest: oh yes, many. c-span: how come no one has ever gotten the job done? >> guest: some have tried, and fidel has a very, very good security system. in the past he had a czechoslovakian who ran his security force and he moved from one place to the other. for example, when he was in havana, i saw him moving near the molicome area with five bullet-proof mercedes, all exactly the same, with the same paint so you could not tell one from the other, and he, i believe, rode either in number two up to number four, in between, so you never knew which one of the five cars he was going to be in. it was very hard to get him. c-span: what will happen when he no longer is in power? >> guest: i think there is going to be a tremendous power struggle inside cuba. i s
CSPAN
Jan 4, 2013 12:00pm EST
crisis in the military sense in these matters. >> israel, katie clark. >> thank you. following the developments -- [inaudible] >> of course we are always careful and in the recent conflict last month, a british defense forces weaponry, and we called on the israeli authorities without including in my own conversations of the israeli foreign minister to abide by international humanitarian law and avoid civilian casualties, and also involved to cooperate with egyptian, thankfully, successfully, egyptians to reach a cease fire, and i think you just also have a written answer on this from alison berg. there's letters, letters have not revoked any licenses, anything we have seen, and in this situation. >> were any talking components that originated in the u.k., and the recent conflict in gaza? >> well, we've no assessment to date whether u.k. weapons or components were usedded, but remember, also, the circumstance. we have to remember in any case the circumstances here. the circumstances i've seen and described them, and as you know, on the floor of the house, think about the wider situa
CSPAN
Jan 7, 2013 5:00pm EST
southern israel so that is a factor of looking at this as well. >> it is a component or equipment in the u.k. used by conflicting and gaza and its aftermath would that be sensible >> we have no evidence to date. >> that is what has happened in the council. >> the situation in the west bank -- you are aware that there were construction - equipment used to build the barrier. >> how is the assessment at what stage used for equipment originated in the u.k. could lease equipment? >> well, those are the why the questions under the licenses and the control regime, but i don't want to give any commitment today to change the rules on that. >> mr. secretary, thank you very much indeed for coming. thank you. i feel very confident that the correspondence between the committees and yourself will continue. thank you very much. >> skill mccuish of the congress failed to reach an agreement on the cybersecurity legislation in 2012 as perhaps many would have predicted. they remained a part opposed to any sort of cybersecurity standard. >> another issue will be for the spectrum so they have this rolled up
CSPAN
Jan 14, 2013 11:00pm EST
foreign aid with the exception of israel afghanistan or pakistan to shift those moneys to instead be spent on american aid it is a substantive because the amount is of unknown for what has been spent on foreign-aid the reason i submit the pay for is of the precarious position the government sees itself. we're on a path to know where financially. then said of the fiscal cliff we have a debt mountain, a $16 trillion of total debt and ane
CSPAN
Jan 5, 2013 2:00am EST
, and sherrod is deciding if he is going to take a trip to israel and figure out farm until a completely different country. you just had your baby, the. >> yes. when i married him, i realized i was marrying a person who was married to the movement. i admire that in him. so, i had to steer -- share him with everyone always. >> but at it beautiful the way you write about when you had to resign and you called charles on the phone, and charles was the one who soothed your spirit as you were driving home on that day, july 2010. so, we have something in common. you made a trip to ghana, you write about that in the book. going to ghana, going to stand in that space where potentially your an an -- ancestors, african slaves, may have come from. >> my goodness. the reason why i had the opportunity to go i had applied for a kellogg scholarship and didn't think i would get it, but during the time of the interview, one person asked me, shirley, is there something you've always wanted to do and you never had chance to do? i said, yes. i always wanted to go to africa. he said, where. i said,
CSPAN
Jan 7, 2013 11:00pm EST
israel. think north korea and so many more. what are the elements the strategy? i'm not going to spend a lot of time on it but just briefly, it assumes we will be smaller, have leaner forces but they will be highly ready forced. one of the way to be leaner, we'll no longer assume we size our forces for long prolonged operations of the sort we conducted in iraq but we'll look for ways of reversibility because we understand we often guess wrong about future threats. we feel the forces must be highly ready because very much of a no-notice category or quality to the sorts of threats to national security, and obviously very important when i come back later to a discussion of sequester. second item is to rebalance our forces. we're working toward rebalancing in eric-pacific, maybe moving around some force, fewer marine on -- okinawa. a rotational presence in australia. some war ships in singapore. possibly a presence in the philippines. we'll pay attention to long term that's, including chine. we'll maintain technological superiority and invest more in some high priority types of activ
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Jan 7, 2013 8:30pm EST
world to include israel, north korea and so many more. so what are the elements of this strategy? i won't spend a lot of time, but briefly it assumes we will be smaller, have leaner forces, but they will be highly ready forces. one of the ways they will be leaner is we will no longer write their forces for long stability operations like we did in iraq. but we will look for ways for reversibility because we understand and often guess wrong about future threats. we feel that we must be highly ready because there is a much of a note on the category of threat to national security. the second major item in that strategy is to rebalance our forces for the pacific in the and the middle east. we are working towards rebalancing asia pacific, maintaining the present era, moving around from forces and it is more on guam. a rotational presence in australia. warships in singapore and possibly a presence in the philippines. we will pay attention to long-term threats, including china. we will maintain technological superiority. the third element of this strategy and invest more of some high-priori
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Jan 4, 2013 11:00pm EST
he is going to take a trip to israel and figure out farm until a completely different country. you just had your baby, the. >> yes. when i married him, i realized i was marrying a person who was married to the movement. i admire that in him. so, i had to steer -- share him with everyone always. >> but at it beautiful the way you write about when you had to resign and you called charles on the phone, and charles was the one who soothed your spirit as you were driving home on that day, july 2010. so, we have something in common. you made a trip to ghana, you write about that in the book. going to ghana, going to stand in that space where potentially your an an -- ancestors, african slaves, may have come from. >> my goodness. the reason why i had the opportunity to go i had applied for a kellogg scholarship and didn't think i would get it, but during the time of the interview, one person asked me, shirley, is there something you've always wanted to do and you never had chance to do? i said, yes. i always wanted to go to africa. he said, where. i said, ghana. so, the first thing i did
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Jan 16, 2013 8:00pm EST
trade missions to and, missions to mexico and israel are planned to expand nevada's global footprint. i am committed to leaving no stone unturned, no road not taken. we must also invest in our nevada's innovators and entrepreneurs. and tonight, i am proud to announce that we will commit $10 million to nevada's knowledge fund to do just that. [applause] for rural nevada, we have also plac an item in e budget to support the university cooperative extension program. we are moving forward on nevada grown, an effort to help provide nevada farm products for nevadans. [applause] and funds to market rural nevada tourisare also increased. [applause] and, we are moving frd with our sage-grouse management plan, to show the federal government that we can manage our own lands and limit further federal intrusion in our lives. [applause] to help vada businesses even more, we will also restructure the nearly $703 million nevada oweso the federal government used to pay unemployment benefits to nevadans who were out of work. thistep will save employers $9 million, stabilize the rate paid by businesses
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Jan 24, 2013 9:00am EST
do with iran and the nuclear threat to israel and the position germany was taking relative to that. i was questioning where they might be should there be a real threat or attack on israel. he said you know that that is not what the public would want us to do but given the holocaust we have no choice but to be there in support of israel. we cannot stand by and let another holocaust take place. so those decades of remorse and guilt over the holocaust dictates policy relative to support for israel even though the public now decades on says why do we need to do that again? do we want to get mixed up in that? that is a unique dynamic that exists in that regard but it is somewhat of a tenuous relationship. i spend a lot of time with israeli ambassador, german, spent a lot of time with the germans relative to german policy toward israel in a number of ways so anything short of direct threat or attack on israel the consensus is we wish we could get this resolved and we wish israel would be more flexible to the west bank and relative to -- >> we have time for one more. let it be two more becau
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Jan 22, 2013 8:00am EST
david of israel characterize the leadership and legacy of his presidency. "those who rule over people must be just. ruling with godly reverence. and they shall be as the light of the morning without clouds as the tender grass springing out of the earth by clear shining after rain." we pray in your sovereign name. amen. the president pro tempore: please join me in reciting please join me in reciting the pledge of allegiance to our flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. tepl under the previous order, the -- the president pro tempore: under the previous order the leadership time is reserved. mr. reid: mr. president, following leader remarks, if any, the senate will be in a period of morning business until 12:30 today. senators during that period of time will be permitted to speak for ten minutes each. we'll be in recess from 12:30 to 2:15 for weekly caucus meetings. today with the inspiration of the second inauguration of president obama fresh on ou
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Jan 14, 2013 5:00pm EST
relief caused by hurricane sandy. what it does is cut into foreign aid with the exception of israel, afghanistan or pakistan and shift those moneys being spent on foreign aid to instead be spent on american aid to the victims of hurricane sandy so it is paid for, it is a substantive pay for the amounts are unknown because it is the key to how much money is spent or has already been spent on foreign aid, and that can fluctuate depending on when this legislation should pass. the reason i am submitting the pay for is because the precarious condition the united states government sees itself to the financially we're on a path to nowhere. financially, we are looking at instead of a fiscal clough, a fourth consecutive deficit we have $16 trillion in total debt to increase that beyond $16 trillion to put that into perspective the amount of damages done to the country on an annual basis now serving the data is excess of $20 billion to put it in perspective that $220 billion that we're spending for servicing the past is three times all of those sought by entertains and the victims. best case
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Jan 18, 2013 9:00am EST
in the midst of the nation that he himself established. the nation of israel was established by god. he set the boundaries and the parameters and the laws for that nation, and he gave it very clear directions for his people in that land on how to treat the nonisraelite. and you can just start reading, and before you know it you come across a passage, for example, that says that you should love the stranger in your midst like yourself, you know? that's pretty strong language, to love the stranger in your midst like yourself. you're not going to do the kinds of things to yourself that some people propose that we do to the person who is here illegally. so when we go to our bible and we read that, we understand that god has an expectation for how a people with power would treat those who are vulnerable and weak in their presence. um, you know, i think god has a lot of reasons for that. one is, certainly, that we understand that these folks also are created in the image of god. they are as much image bearers of god as we are. they are as deserving of respect and dignity that comes with t
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Jan 29, 2013 8:00pm EST
into the picture, too. the other thing in 1965 israel televisions with rabbit ears on them. now we've got telephones and tvs and smartphones that we don't really talk about what we need to do to get our phones better 50 years later. we talk about what we have to do to get her help care system better. it's because the way we pay. it's going to be hard to get there. the mullahs are trying to get there. the only way were going to get there is to get everybody looking at the capital infrastructure, not just a sgr, but across the board and make a model that the value proposition , and the value migration happens if i can be a little economic out of the system we have for the profit value is captured and doing lots and lots of things that are quite bad for patients more often than not. >> dr. murphy, you're nodding your head. >> yes, that's very observant. i'll deviate a little bit. i'll ask a question and answer to this i guess it's a rhetorical question. at least in my ear i'll throw my hat about which you have to do, what the solution is. a fair question to me is if there is that level o
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Jan 30, 2013 9:00am EST
. he'he's been focused on the mide east peace process and israel's security forays entire time on the foreign relations committee. for more than 30 years senator kerry has been a powerful voice for his constituents in massachusetts as well as an engaged citizen of the world. throughout those years john has matched his u unflinching passin with forward-thinking action. no one is better qualified than john kerry to continue the exceptional work of secretary of state hillary cline it un. while we're sad to lose his leadership in the senate, we saw yesterday the support that he has -- virtually every senator voted to support him as the next secretary of state -- i wish him well as he is embarks on this next challenge. i am confident he will meet the challenge. mr. mcconnell: madam president in. the presiding officer: the republican leader. mr. mcconnell: a few weeks ago president obama reported that -- a few weeks ago president obama reportedly said that america doesn't have a spending problem. this is completely at odds with what independent experts tell us and what is perfectly apparent
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Jan 2, 2013 8:00pm EST
was supposed to have met him in israel and of course i didn't go because of the six-day war and i was at loose ends, and i ended up, because because the hunt st. clinic -- i don't know if you guys remember the signs that said take the trip to end the trip or love means care. i should have come over to the clinic and not gone there because they were using disposable needles and i got a blood test and i became really ill with hepatitis within six weeks. and i mean really ill as an i couldn't pick up the telephone to make a call. people i taught with put a sign up outside my door with three meals a day, early morning, late at night for people to sign up and take care of me. and the dead filled in most of those times, and took great care. i had food and i had my linens changed and people helped me to the bathroom, all those things that only comes from family. when a family is taking care of you. so around the time that i was recovered enough to get out and sit in my wing chair and looked out the window and the view i would have is down the asbury st. to the dead house, i watched the big f
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Jan 7, 2013 12:00pm EST
on several issues including the u.k.'s arms export policy with syria and israel, and the implications of the arms embargo on u.k. policy. he's joined by the head of the department within the british foreign commonwealth office. this is about an hour. [background sounds] >> foreign secretary, may we welcome you to the committee on arms and export controls once again. and may we also welcome mr. richards to the foray and many james -- [inaudible] i'm going to start with a question on the arms trade treaty which i generously gave you advance notice in my -- [inaudible] debate last week. [laughter] and in that debate, um, i stated that the principle of consensus whilst it may be helpful in getting negotiations upside way -- though that doesn't always pooh -- prove the case, the principle consensus has not succeeded in getting any text underway at all. but yuftion for the consensus principle in the context of the arms trade treaty, the history of consensus is that it is the kiss of death be one is trying to reach -- if one is trying to reach an agreement, a big, multilateral,
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Jan 29, 2013 12:00pm EST
, turkey, jordan, lebanon and israel. okay? it is as if we live in a fantasy world to think that the implications of the conflict there have absolutely no meaning for our own national security. it's a disaster, and what we can do now is try and contain that disaster and hasten the movement of assad out and insure that whoever is in charge actually is a group that is or a group of groups that respects and values the kind of values that we have rather or than the kind of values that, say, qatar has. did you want to add? all my colleagues want to add something. >> yeah, look, this is also a case where we're paying the price for having persuaded ourselves that iraq was a country that is hoe candidated -- located somewhere on the moon and doesn't actually share common borders with any place on the earth that is of any significance to us. and because we adopted that approach and because secondarily to that the administration decided that nouri al-maliki was our best friend and the guy we needed to back at all costs, the result of that is that iraq has been feeding the situation in syria in
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Jan 28, 2013 12:00pm EST
under the oak pages of israel since 1967. that was really the focus of the program which i'm associated but this is important to the question that you raise. extreme importance on having a functional institutions of government. and i think the challenge that faces all of us in other words is that insure we have functional governments. in fact i myself believe what happened, the phenomenon known as arab spring, arab a waking, what have you, to my way of looking at things is more in the nature of evolution than anything else and that is adds to the challenge that all of us face because we've been affected by it to varying degrees. how to manage expectations if this is a revolution. how will the people of arab world can be accepting of this only you can wait on us, can we do better. that is serious challenge. this is what they have -- [inaudible] people have the right to expect dramatic changes. the particularly give the backdrop against which that awakening happened. i think the jury is still out on this. yet to deliver when in terms of the extent which we're going to success full. for it
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Jan 23, 2013 7:30am EST
israel some because they have fallen out with turkey? but i'd like to get some idea who how you view current foreign policy in greece. >> translator: i could tell you that -- is that a country doesn't have continue newty in the foreign policy. we going to come not to do a 180 and turn everything around, but able to give a multidimensional and active tone to our foreign policy. during my meeting with the u.s. ambassador, earlier this week, he told me what does it mean? what is multiidimensional and active foreign policy mean? greece is a country in europe but it's not like the other european countries. we're not lucky enough to be bordered by sweden. our borders are a hot bed. a hot area in the met mediterranean basin inspect is an area that is historically has been a region where there have been attempts to assert one's claims and make attempts associated with the special geostrategic position. some of the arab spring, we have instability in the area. i told you before, it's an energy hub. we are going help the efforts to make greece a region of stability, cooperation, and we want pe
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Jan 12, 2013 4:30pm EST
saudi arabia and israel. he had bilogical weapons and makings of a nuclear realms program, and, in fact, israel bombed a reactor and seventh back that program. he was a man who had a fairly substantial wmd arsenal much like assad has in syria today, and the task after the first gulf war was to dismantle that arsenal, and part of what led to the debate wmd of the second iraq war, the 2003 war was a lot of people in the united nations and american government were not satisfied that the weapons that he did have had been fully e eradicated and hard to prove a negative. we now know by the time the 2003 invasion occurred, this one substantial arsenal basically deteriorated into nothing or had been removed. that was not understood at the time in part because for a period of years, there was not u.n. inspections in iraq. >> host: how many times did you go over to iraq? >> guest: i'm not sure i remember exactly, but i was -- i covered the first war, the 1991 war, and i wrote a book about it called "the journal's war," and then i was there for the invasion in 2003. i got to baghdad on april 12th,
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